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Journalism and Mass Communication

Global Media and Communication Policy

Global Media and Communication Policy

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Global Media and Communication Policy offers new conceptual frameworks and new methodologies for mapping the contours of emergent global media and communication policy, drawing on theory and empirical research to offer multiple perspectives on the local, national, regional and global forums in which policy debate occurs. This book provides insights into the boundaries of this field of study, assesses why it is important, who is affected, and with what political, economic, social and cultural consequences. The book aims to enhance the reader?s knowledge and understanding of policy and regulatory issues, particularly at global level.

Globalization drives the dissemination and adoption of new forms of media. Internet access is becoming more common, indeed, more essential, to everyday life across the world, in both developing and developed nations. Global media policy, however, struggles to keep up with the ever-evolving technological advances. This book will feature articles discussing some of the challenges in implementing policies to govern global media and communications, and it will feature articles that attempt to provide some solutions to those issues. Some tools and technologies that facilitate positive governance will be presented. There will be a focus on the special needs of developing countries, their vulnerability when it comes to enabling increased access, and how positive global media governance can facilitate that. Government involvement in this process, throughout the world, is crucial, as is maintaining transparency between policy-makers and users. But of equal importance is the public?s own participation in shaping policy. This book will also cover how the media itself shapes policy-making across a wide subject of issues, including public health. We begin by outlining the need for implementing policies to govern global media is ?Toward a Humanistic Conception of Cyberspace.? The tension between regulation and technology will be explored in ?Telecommunication Policy,? a review of current policy with regards to the Communications Act Update. While the Internet can be a great equalizer of men and nations, there will always be haves and have nots. ?The Disempowering Goverati? argues that an e-aristocracy has formed with the advent of new media and communications technologies, and it offers the case of the operation of capitalism and politics in and on democracy as an example. Does the media have a responsibility to incorporate cultural diversity, to eliminate this disparity between the Goverati and others? To encourage the participation and coverage of those ?have nots?? ?Cultural Diversity as a Concept of Global Law? argues that the media should play a part in global policy-making. While international aid has been instrumental in improving the quality of life in the ?Global South,? facilitating access to media has lagged behind. ?From the Field? asks whether that matters - how important is media to development? Should access be a global policy priority? ?Media and Public Communications Policies? identifies that newspapers selectively choose what to cover, sometimes resulting in ignoring crucial events. Should it be a media priority to be more inclusive? ?Governance of Public Service Media in Poland: The Role of the Public? looks at the role of the public in shaping media policy, rather than vice versa. Media policy is generally thought of as something imposed from above, especially in the developing world. However, an international indigenous media movement is underfoot, in which the goal is to preserve language and tradition. Discover how policy helps shape this process in ?Cultural Resiliency and the Rise of Indigenous Media,? a review of the new book, The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication. Another example of this ?bottom up? public influence on media policy is ?The Role of the Media in the Construction of Public Belief and Social Change,? which highlights the role the media plays in shaping future policy for social change. It suggests that media and communications policy encouraging positive portrayal of controversial topics like disability can result in positive social change. Much of this book focuses on various aspects of global media policy, but it can also be enacted on a more local level. ?Comparing Czech and Slovak Council Newspapers? Policy and Regulation Development? does just that in analyzing local newspapers. South Korea has created Migrant World Television (MWTV) to promote multiculturalism, as the nation becomes more multi-ethnic. Communications policy can be used to stimulate or sustain economic growth. ?Raising Competitiveness for Tourist Destinations? discusses how the European Commission?s technology policies can enhance the competitiveness of their member nations? tourism industries. Language can play a part in determining a nation?s media policy. The conflict between Estonian and Russian media policy within Estonia is featured in ?One Country, Two Polarised Audiences.? Public health is another area in which media policy can play a positive role, especially in regards to the developing world. For example, ?Can the ubiquitous power of mobile phones be used to improve health outcomes in developing countries?? offers an early insight into how technology can be used in healthcare interventions. Related to encouraging the use of media and communications technology for economic advantage through policy are policies aimed at restricting certain media. The European ban on tobacco advertising is one such policy, also directed towards improving public health outcomes. The final articles in this book will focus on policies and security concerns that have arisen from specific problematic aspects of information technology. As interconnectivity gains increasing importance in

ALEXANDRA PRENTISS

ALEXANDRA PRENTISS

A native of Rhode Island, in the U.S., Alexandra obtained her Bachelor’s degree in History from Johns Hopkins University and her Master’s in Media and Communications from the London School of Economics. Her Master’s dissertation examined blogs through the lens of psychoanalysis. Alexandra has worked internationally in Prague, Marseille, Tel Aviv, New York and Seattle in various communications and marketing positions in industries such as consumer goods, technology and event production. Her current interests lie in editing and corporate content development.