• Connect with us:

Journalism and Mass Communication

Media and Communications - Laws and Regulations

Media and Communications - Laws and Regulations

  • Editor(s)
  • Publication Year
  • ISBN
  • Price
  • Publisher
  • Binding Type

This book aims to generate and disseminate knowledge about communication, and the way in which it operates and affects individuals and nations. Media regulation is the control or guidance of mass media by governments and other bodies. This regulation, via law, rules or procedures, can have various goals, for example intervention to protect a stated ?public interest?, or encouraging competition and an effective media market, or establishing common technical standards.

This book will focus on the host of legal and regulatory issues that have come with the expansion of the digital age. Privacy often seems to be a thing of the past, and how has the law coped with this? Intellectual property - to whom does it belong? Cyber-terrorism, cyber-criminality, cyber-bullying - all have taken root and blossomed in various ways throughout the Internet. Laws and regulations simply cannot keep up with the fast paced evolution of ways to thwart them. One of the central issues that jurisprudence struggles with when it comes to the digital age is the notion of privacy, and what it means in a networked society. We are awash in data, much of it personal. All of the topics we cover in this book boil down in one way or another to privacy. With the advent of the Internet came a new medium via which criminals can operate. From petty scams to global heists, the Internet is host to a plethora of illicit and illegal activity. Regulators and lawmakers are struggling to keep up with the challenges. Here, we present a number of the challenges, as well as some of the tools that are in development to counter criminal activity on the Internet. Crime and how the Internet has enabled it in new ways will be the subject of the first articles in this book. Cyber-criminals perpetrate cyber-attacks. But not much scholarly research has been performed on these attacks. ?Cyber-Attack Attributes? identifies some types, their objectives, and their targets. Cyber-criminals have honed their trade, developing ever more sophisticated tools to achieve their goals - whether that be hacking for information (spying) or money. In fact, ?crimeware? can now be bought and sold in online marketplaces, stymying law enforcement efforts. ?Crimeware Marketplaces and Their Facilitating Technologies? takes an in depth look. So, how to counter these sophisticated criminals? Cyber security is key. There are many ways of improving cyber security - which very much depend on what is protected. ?Cybersecurity and Cyber-Resilient Supply Chains? looks at the legal challenges to enforcing cyber security measures for customer supply chains. ?Cybersecurity Futures: How Can We Regulate Emergent Risks?? examines trends in this rapidly growing sector. Of course, it is not only criminals who wish to access our private information. Governments, too, want the ability to monitor their citizens, citing security concerns. And they have the power to influence laws granting that right. Read how security firms work with governments to monitor private citizens - and why it?s legally problematic - in ?Internal Security Institutions Meeting Internet Governance? and ?EU Law and Mass Internet Metadata Surveillance in the Post-Snowden Era?. Social media gives those who want to surveil unfettered access to individuals? lives. Facebook, especially, has come under legal scrutiny. ?Battling for Rights? provides an Irish view, while ?Data protection laws and privacy on Facebook? provides a South African opinion. Intellectual property in new media is a major concern for legal regulators. Copyright law has had to evolve with the profusion of Internet activity. It is not only individuals whose rights are infringed upon, but also companies. Napster, of course, was the landmark case for copyright infringement, but issues have arisen far and wide of the music industry (although that continues to be a problem). Copyright advocates and media companies seek to tighten laws, while ?pirates? and those who want less privacy, seek to stymy the creation of laws restricting their activities. Watermarking, e-signatures and other electronic authorization methods are some of the ways lawmakers and technology developers counter copyright infringements. The next few articles will focus on these issues. ?A Pirate too Needs to be Heard? shows just how difficult copyright cases can be to prove - the author notes that most current laws are simply inadequate - and also how procedurally, criminals are treated differently from those whose crimes take place ?in real life?. In some cases, expanding access to intellectual property can be a positive. In the case of e-books in Swedish libraries, increased availability to copyrighted material brings increased access to those who perhaps would not have had that opportunity. ?Degrees of Secrecy in an Open Environment? also approaches open access as a positive and presents some of the legal challenges in promulgating it. Cyber-bullying is another type of attack that takes place online - while it is often more personal than cyber-criminality, it is equally difficult to prosecute, albeit for different legal reasons. We often hear of children and adolescents who suffer from cyber-bullies, but, unfortunately, it is not a phenomenon one outgrows. Adolescent victims? mental health has been shown to be severely impacted, sometimes permanently, as a result of their experiences; ?Bullying in school and cyberspace? presents some research of this. Cyber-bullying is present in adult life, as well, as examined in ?Cyberbullying at work?. The question is, should this be subject to the rule of law? Or is it simply out of the reach of the law because it takes place in another medium? Would it be prosecutable offline? Not only

ALEXANDRA PRENTISS

ALEXANDRA PRENTISS

A native of Rhode Island, in the U.S., Alexandra obtained her Bachelor’s degree in History from Johns Hopkins University and her Master’s in Media and Communications from the London School of Economics. Her Master’s dissertation examined blogs through the lens of psychoanalysis. Alexandra has worked internationally in Prague, Marseille, Tel Aviv, New York and Seattle in various communications and marketing positions in industries such as consumer goods, technology and event production. Her current interests lie in editing and corporate content development.